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E-Cigarette (E-Cig) Battery Explosions

Weinstein Couture is accepting e-cig battery explosion lawsuits and is investigating claims of failed and faulty e-cig mechanical mod devices. If you or a loved one has been injured by an e-cig device, please contact Weinstein Couture about investigating a lawsuit at 800-406-1690 or use the contact form on this page.

E-Cigarette (E-Cig) Battery Explosions

E-Cigarettes are a newer consumer product designed to replace traditional cigarettes. The devices are battery-operated vaporizers, and using the e-cigarette is known as "vaping." The devices are marketed as a "healthier alternative" or smoking cessation devices because they are tobacco-free and they don't burn, but they still contain and vaporize nicotine.

Additionally, there have been many recent news reports indicating that the design of e-cigs, in particular, the "mechanical mod" devices, can result in batteries that catch on fire or explode. This failure can result in serious personal injury, especially if the explosion occurs during use.

An e-cig is made of six parts:

Parts of an electronic cigarette

  • Mouthpiece
  • Cartridge (tank)
  • Heating element (atomizer)
  • Microprocessor (in digital devices)/Mechanical switch (in mechanical devices)
  • Battery
  • LED light

The mechanical mod vaporizers are sold to consumers to be intentionally modifiable. Customers are instructed to mix and match various components, from batteries to heating elements and switches, the change the behavior of their devices. Unfortunately, these changes also alter the power consumption and draw of the device, which can then result in battery failure or explosion.

Battery explosions:

Like all batteries, an e-cig battery has limits on the temperature it can withstand or the power that can safely be drawn from the device. A device can be poorly constructed and more prone to failure, or be designed in a way that makes eventual failures highly likely. Typically, e-cig batteries are lithium-ion batteries, which will catch fire or explode if not used properly.

Faulty design by e-cig manufacturers can result in battery usage that exceeds the limitations of the battery, leading to catastrophic failures. Once the battery overheats, it can quickly cause a chain reaction that leads to ignition, explosion, or leakage of superheated liquid. If a lithium-ion battery catches fire in your pocket, it can cause serious burns to your body. If it explodes in your hand or mouth, the damage could be even more catastrophic or even fatal.

According to the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) and U.S. Fire Administration, 80% of e-cig explosions happen during charging. In a variety of reports, the cause is often linked to the use of an alternative charger-one that was not sold with the battery that was charging.

Battery explosions in recent news:

June 9, 2016: Seattle, WA: At least 14 people have been treated or hospitalized at Harborview since October 2015 for serious burns and injuries when e-cig batteries exploded

April 15, 2016: Orange, CA: Family therapist loses eye after e-cig explodes

April 5, 2016: Brooklyn, NY: Boy partially blinded after e-cig battery explodes

February 20, 2016: Owensboro, KY: E-cig battery explodes, causing severe burns on right thigh

January 17, 2016: Windsor, CA: Boy loses teeth after e-cig explodes in his mouthe-cigarette

December 2015: Seattle, WA: E-Cigarette explodes, burning man's right hand and arm

November 20, 2015: Colorado Springs, CO: 29 year-old suffers broken neck, facial fractures, and burns to mouth when e-cig battery explodes

February 9, 2015: San Diego, CA: Liquor store employee hospitalized with burns to his face after an e-cig exploded

U.S. Fire Administration and FDA Regulation:

In October 2014, the U.S. Fire Administration and FEMA released a report on Electronic Cigarette Fires and Explosions. As of October 2014, the U.S. Fire Administration claimed that e-cig battery explosions were rare. However, the market in the United States for e-cigarettes has since grown rapidly-particularly the market for the more dangerous vaporizer, digital and mechanical mod devices. As the market for larger vaporizers grows, so does the frequency of catastrophic consumer injuries.

Because e-cigarettes are still fairly new on the market, the U.S. Food Administration's (FDA) warnings about vaping products are limited. Until 2016, the only FDA warning on e-cigarettes was as follows:
"WARNING: This product contains nicotine. Nicotine is an addictive chemical."

The FDA also decided in 2016 that all vaping products should be subject to the same regulations as other tobacco products. The FDA began officially regulating e-cigarettes in May 2016, and e-cig manufacturers must now disclose all of their products' ingredients to the FDA. Additionally, the regulations banned minors from purchasing vaping products, like the traditional cigarettes' regulations.

As of now, the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission has advised that e-cigarettes do not fall under its jurisdiction. Underwriters Laboratories (UL) has developed standards that relate to lithium-ion battery safety. However, current e-cigarette designs and products are not required to be subjected to product safety testing, even though most similar products undergo such testing. Given the high potential dangers of these devices, it is not surprising consumers are being injured by these unsafe devices.

Popular e-cig vaporizer brands:

  • Aspire
  • CloudCig
  • eLeaf
  • JoyeTech
  • Innokin
  • KangerTech
  • Pioneer4You
  • Sigelei
  • SMOKTech
  • Tobeco
  • USA Made Mods

Popular batteries:

  • AW IMR
  • Efest IMR
  • EH IMR
  • MNKE IMR
  • Samsung ICR INR
  • Sony
  • Trustfire IMR
  • Panasonic
  • Orbtronic

E-Cig battery explosion lawsuit

Weinstein Couture is accepting e-cig battery explosion lawsuits and is investigating claims of failed and faulty e-cig mechanical mod devices. If you or a loved one has been injured by an e-cig device, please contact Weinstein Couture about investigating a lawsuit at 800-406-1690 or use the contact form on this page.